Pure Propaganda

Teads.tv, aptly near in several senses to Turds.tv, has the chutzpah to vocalize corporate capitalist dogma without a shred of shame. According to these hawkers, not only is the present content of the mass media in the United States “great,” but only through the current system of advertising-based production and distribution could we get any content at all. Take a look:

Beneath this amazing video, Teads tries to complain about public ignorance and ingratitude:

According to Teads research, 68% of consumers underestimate the amount of revenue that advertising contributes to media sites. The tendency to devalue the significance of ads might relate to the fact that many display and video units are designed without regard for the user-experience. Such units are interruptive to online activities, and too many of them can severely compromise a website’s look and appeal. To avoid these types of ads, many users have installed ad blockers—a move that removes frustrating online ads, but also cuts off the revenue that online content producers need to keep publishing great content.

Of course, the other way to read that 68% number is as evidence of overclass success at keeping the nature of its totalitarianism out of the public eye. Are folks ungrateful for capitalism’s great media gifts, or do capitalists want nothing to do with public consideration and supervision of basic media policies and practices? When people learn the facts about “the significance of ads,” do they get happy, or pissed off?

TCT suggests that the Teadsters may have swallowed their own bullshit a bit too deeply. As more seasoned and mature overclass forces know all too well, when it comes to the core institutional facts about big business marketing, an informed public would be an irate public.

As for the supposedly advertiser-desired open and honest debate of how our media works and the universe of alternatives, TCT says bring it on.

And while we’re at it, anybody want to make the video for “Imagine the Future if Advertisers Continue to Rule”? It ain’t a pretty picture.

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The Height of Capitalist Cynicism

cynicism So, with design help from Saatchi & Saatchi New York, Walmart is currently running this cause marketing campaign. Have you seen anything more unspeakable in every possible direction? A colored lightbulb (and heightened loyalty to Walmart) will supposedly do something meaningful about PTSD, mass un- and under-employment, and the carnage of war — to say nothing of the always-unmentioned criminality and futility of the wars in question.

To quote Mickey Sachs, “If Jesus came back and saw what was being done in his name, he’d never stop throwing up.”

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Least Surprising News: Verizon is Spyware

eyeball The shameless profit ranchers we in the USA allow to sell us our cell phone service not only provide us massively over-priced substandard products, but turn around and sell our data to other corporate overlords. As always with big business marketing, it only grows. According to Advertising Age:

Under the radar, Verizon, Sprint, Telefonica and other carriers have partnered with firms including SAP, IBM, HP and AirSage to manage, package and sell various levels of data to marketers and other clients. It’s all part of a push by the world’s largest phone operators to counteract diminishing subscriber growth through new business ventures that tap into the data that showers from consumers’ mobile web surfing, text messaging and phone calls.

[M]arketers and agencies are testing never-before-available data from cellphone carriers that connects device location and other information with telcos’ real-world files on subscribers. Some services offer real-time heat maps showing the neighborhoods where store visitors go home at night, lists the sites they visited on mobile browsers recently and more.

SAP’s Consumer Insight 365 ingests regularly updated data representing as many as 300 cellphone events per day for each of the 20 million to 25 million mobile subscribers. SAP won’t disclose the carriers providing this data. It “tells you where your consumers are coming from, because obviously the mobile operator knows their home location,” said Lori Mitchell-Keller, head of SAP’s global retail industry business unit.

The global market for telco data as a service is potentially worth $24.1 billion this year, on its way to $79 billion in 2020, according to estimates by 451 Research based on a survey of likely customers. “Challenges and constraints” mean operators are scraping just 10% of the possible market right now, though that will rise to 30% by 2020, 451 Research said.

And so it goes…

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