Transparency, My Butt

“It’s our intention to be transparent as we execute our plan and we will provide you regular updates on our progress.”  So lied the General Motors corporation’s Dissembler-in-Chief, Rick Wagoner, as he accepted a direct public handout in this, the land where the idea of public health insurance remains out-of-bounds.

Of course, the place where the real record of actual corporate intentions, methods, and plans resides is in the marketing papers.  Those, of course, are never going to be sought or revealed in this latest farcical capitalist boondoggle.  That would be real transparency (think back to the importance of the tobacco marketing papers).  It would also be the end of the line for the overclass, so it’s not happening.

If the underlying marketing documents were ever released, the public would learn some pretty fascinating things about the real strategy behind the current “better cars” charade.  Consider, for instance, the way The Wall Street Journal describes that phenomenon:

If GM isn’t able to build the Flint factory in time for the 2010 launch, the 1.4-liter [gasoline] engine to be used in the Volt could be sourced from overseas factories that are already building the engine.

Much is riding on GM’s ability to fulfill its promise to deliver the Volt, a plug-in electric car with a small [gasoline] engine onboard that would kick in when the battery runs down.

GM is looking to the much-hyped Chevy to do what the Prius hybrid did for Toyota — give the auto maker a must-have technology while cultivating a green image.

See?  That “alternative” power source is what they call a “marketing stimulus,” a product attribute whose main function is to boost sales.  That’s corporate marketing 101, folks.  And it’s there, even if it’s not encompassed in the “transparency” show.

If we had serious transparency in this market-totalitarian society, we’d be getting our hands on those marketing records and admitting the truth, which is that the automobile is a blatantly unsustainable, outdated technology, and is known as such to its pushers, who are simply trying to milk their investments dry before parking their capital in the Caymans.  The Earth simply does not have the energy to permit us to roll around in 2,000-pound boxes for our every trip about town.

We should be nationalizing the auto industry, and turning its assets to production of rail, bicycle, and pedestrian equipment and infrastructure.