Meanwhile, on the Production Side

Seems job satisfaction of U.S. workers is at an all-time low.

Under market totalitarianism, the ordinary people are not supposed to expect jobs to be a source of happiness or personal growth.  As Noam Chomsky says, when it comes to their internal structure and operations, private businesses are unaccountable tyrannies.  A few minimal regulations keep the most egregious kinds of theft and endangerment under some external control, but beyond that, going on the wage-clock generally means finding a way to make it through another stretch of deadening mindlessness and stress.

It speaks volumes about the completeness of our overclass’s social domination that, in our time of Great Recession, we constantly hear about “cutting back” on our shopping and product-acquisition, but nobody dares suggest that maybe we could resolve many of our frustrations and dilemmas by taking a radical democratic look at work and employment issues.

And not to pile on, but one might also note how well the current dilemma was predicted in 1974 by one Harry Braverman, who was consciously trying to extend Baran and Sweezy’s Monopoly Capital.  Braverman’s book reads like it was written yesterday.  The only missing piece is a chapter on the globalization of employment.

On that last point, reader Mapp posted this fascinating comment and link.

3 Replies to “Meanwhile, on the Production Side”

  1. On the globalization of employment (and Mapp’s point):

    Whatever happens as international labor costs rise and outsourcing begins to look less attractive (or at least increasingly risky), the absolute divorce between production and “consumption” will have to continue. The head boys don’t want people thinking too much about where this sweater or that ipod or whatever came from. To erase the economic is to make all its oppressive machinery invisible.

    And whatever happens to the laborers of the future, the head boys will try their best to keep them divided both from the products that they produce and from one another. No chance that they’ll let a critical mass of underpaid workers accumulate in any single place where they might begin to consider their collective plight.

  2. Is it any wonder that people don’t rock the boat in today’s world when life itself depends on being a wage slave?

    No job means no health care, no home, hungar and despair.

    Daniel Quinn pretty much said it all in the book Ishmael. When you lock up the food you can control what people do and how they act.

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