Monday, December 24th, 2012

Marketing in Your Footsteps

Hey, hey, mighty brontosaurus, do you have a lesson for us?

How much different will today’s incessant ads for automobiles look to our grandchildren, should we manage to pass them a society that still has electricity and complex machinery?

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Posted by Michael Dawson | Filed in A Culture of..., Bad Products


6 Responses to “Marketing in Your Footsteps”

  1. December 24th, 2012 at 4:57 pm

    Martin said:

    Ah, TCT should be saluted for keeping the flame burning bright in 2012.
    None of this was taken care of, though – Canadians, our supposed betters, smoke like fiends in public, and the corporate profits of the killer cigarette companies, like those of the killer car companies, are woven through succesive generations of rich families.
    The next generation, and the one after that, are inheriting disaster – so did we, like these dumbass commercials and drone politicians, but these televisual oddities make for a good laugh, and make this one hell of a good time to be alive – to celebrate the supreme fun of castigating bullshit.

  2. December 25th, 2012 at 11:12 am

    Michael Dawson said:

    Thanks, Martin, for the kind words. And you are supremely right — we live in a Golden Age for social criticism. If one views it as sport, it does have its limited pleasures. 2013 will surely be even more “fun.”

  3. December 26th, 2012 at 4:22 am

    Marla Singer said:

    Well, that may be the wrong question. The urbanized and fortified enclaves with machines and electricity that remain probably won’t notice that much of adifference, and the teeming masses outside will be too hungry, developmentally and cognitively impaired, and desperate to notice it either. As my father likes to say these days, the world is sliding into a “concentration camp” mentality, i.e. “you die today, I’ll die tomorrow”, meaning that everybody has given up on trying to find a dignified solution, and all that is left is maximising the short term benefits (e.g. an extra lunch, or a blanket), and not thinking about the possibly impending death tomorrow, and worst of all – discounting the death of your fellow prisoners today..

    I woke up particularly desperate today. Things may look surviveable up there in Oregon, but looking around me here in Texas, it’s an already a very bleak and scary situation with the growing poverty and thoughtless development – if you look at the new highways and subdivisions, you’d think that nobody has ever seen the overwhelming data on how bad, bad, bad, these ideas are.

    All I can do is be mad, eat some delicious breakfast tacos while they are still available, and trim my belongings (a task that’s very difficult thtoughout th year, but especially difficult at christmas time. My mother ini law gave us a goddamned Keurig coffee brewer AND a rotating carousel for storing the stupid plastic one time use k-cups. Instead of launching an epic rant, i faked an epic excitement and therefore, contributed to the problem.)

  4. December 26th, 2012 at 9:34 am

    Michael Dawson said:

    That’s why Christmas is such a great capitalist trick: It requires increasingly contrived purchases, as so many people already “have everything.” Maybe next year, your MIL can get you a Soda Stream, so you can make your own sugar-water from their own set of packaged potions and counter-top thingamajigs.

  5. December 27th, 2012 at 2:11 pm

    Marla Singer said:

    Whoa, it better be the premium stainless steel model for $129 smackaroos, not the cheap $79 working class model. :’(

  6. December 29th, 2012 at 6:43 pm

    Mark Lovas said:

    One of the nice t hings about your book, Michael, was your mention of clutter— he said, as he stumbled over the collection of miscellaneous possibly useful items his eighty- something mother is saving just in case, or because there is not time to sort through them……and here the c losets are full of past years gifts no longer ever used…..



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