Thursday, November 21st, 2013

GoldieBlox: Engineered Ideology

When I hear the word “engineer,” I reach for my revolver. Comrade MS has discovered this astounding piece of faux feminist detritus. Who in the world finds the idea of females being engineers controversial at this point in time? Nobody. That, of course, doesn’t stop the corporate media from lapping up this junk.

One wonders which is worse: the insipid, still-sexist, entirely unserious pandering about very serious social issues, the bogus claims about national shortages of scientists, or the raw chutzpah of the creep behind it all. I supposed I’d say the latter, on the grounds that Debbie Sterling’s claim to being an engineer is her training in product design! She’s a god-damned marketing consultant — a perception engineer!

Et voilĂ :

For the past 7 years, she has also served as a brand strategy consultant for a wide variety of organizations including Microsoft, T-Mobile, Organic Valley and the New York Knicks.

Last but not least, clap eyes on the pathetic objects being peddled in this scam on moronic yuppies:

goldieblox

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Posted by Michael Dawson | Filed in Bad Products, Sexism


14 Responses to “GoldieBlox: Engineered Ideology”

  1. November 21st, 2013 at 2:09 pm

    Martin said:

    Why the non-congratulatory tone towards Ms. Young Big Hair? She, the selfless nascent neo-tycoon/Jesus, can claim that the “inspiration to create a mission-driven company came in 2008, when she spent 6 months volunteering at a grassroots nonprofit in rural India.” And if that’s not enough service to the wretched poor of the world, who will no doubt be employed detoxifying up the plastic detritus from her holiday obscenities (Girl PArade in a box or some such monstrosity,) she already at work, shen she’s not a the hairdresser,” inspiring the next generation of female engineers.” And she’s a TED snake oil guru-lite to boot! Thanks, Stanford, the corrupt yin to Harvard’s corrupt yang!
    She’s a fascist trifecta!

  2. November 28th, 2013 at 3:07 am

    nercules said:

    This just in:
    http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/27/showbiz/beastie-boys-girls-ad-pulled/index.html?hpt=hp_c5

    Key extract: [A parody version of the Beastie Boys' 'Girls'] has been removed from the video, which went viral this month and gained millions of online viewers, Sterling said.

    “When we made our parody version of your song, ‘Girls’, we did it with the best of intentions,” Sterling said. “We wanted to transform it into a powerful anthem for girls.” The company did not realize that Beastie Boys member Adam Yauch, who died last year, HAD IN HIS WILL THAT HE WANTED HIS SONGS TO NEVER BE USED IN ADVERTISING.

    “Although we believe our parody video falls under fair use, we would like to respect his wishes and yours,” she wrote.

    …..

    Well, well, how kind of Ms Sterling. Now that he’s gained her multi-millions of web hits, she has the grace to respect the wishes of the dead. After all, she’s a huge fan!!!!!

  3. December 3rd, 2013 at 8:36 pm

    Marla Singer said:

    http://www.thebaffler.com/past/of_flying_cars

    Get with this guy (David Graeber). The piece would have been much better if he had cited and used “Monopoly capital”, but not bad anyway

  4. December 3rd, 2013 at 8:40 pm

    Marla Singer said:

    PS this was meant to be vaguely on topic – the whole excitement about how much we need engineers (in spite of the evidence to the contrary) is in itself a marketing gimmick to prop the student loan industry going, as well as to cultivate mindless worshiping of technology (rather than a ctirical analysis of technological development, which is mainly a political issue)

  5. December 4th, 2013 at 9:49 am

    Michael Dawson said:

    Quite so. And it’s worth noting that Ms. Goldiblox is herself a disproof of her own marketing hook about the dire need for real scientists. Beeatch is a marketer, despite her claim that she’s an engineer! How could that happen, if “the market” craves scientists? The reality is that the demand for real science is severely limited by corporate capitalism, which prefers studying ways to improve cola marketing to studying ways to make better trains or run industrial-scale permaculture.

  6. December 4th, 2013 at 6:44 pm

    Marla Singer said:

    One thing that particularly pains me is that so many otherwise well-meaning and ostensibly educated polite middle classers fall for this, and accordingly never tire of preaching the virtues of education, and showcase the science-related extracurricular activities of their kids that surely foreshadow their future greatness as the society’s saviors and demigods (I wish i was going overboard, but I just witnessed a friend literally brag how the fact that her 2nd graders already attend programming courses will “hopefully lead to a better world 20 years from now”….)

    This type of naivete drives me back and forth between rage and pity. Sure, you can make the argument of the intrinsic goodness of education, scientific and liberal arts alike. But who in their right mind would deny this inherent value?

    It is the blindness to the self-serving and power-hungry nature for the jockeying for such “education” that’s both pathetic and scary. Need we point out that Hitler was elected by the *best educated people in the world at the time*? Or that all of the present day atrocities are committed by people with elite university educations? Or that the viability of “common sense technological fixes” nave absolutely nothing to do with the lack of technology or information, but with public policy and politics?

    All of humanity’s most pressing problems are solvable with decidedly low-tech or non-tech means.

    Which is not to say that scientific creativity and progress should not be treasured for their inherent enlightenment and liberation potential. But between lack of scientific progress and earnest narrow minded polite future middle class drone designers, I’m pretty sure the lack of further technological progress is the better option, if I must chose one…

  7. December 4th, 2013 at 8:46 pm

    Marla Singer said:

    BTW, check this recent study claiming that engineering education diminishes concern for the public good. I don’t know how rigorous it is, but is certainly plausible given how things are going in universities lately:

    http://news.rice.edu/2013/11/20/engineering-education-may-diminish-concern-for-public-welfare-issues-sociologist-says/

  8. December 6th, 2013 at 10:04 am

    Michael Dawson said:

    I don’t think there’s any doubt about the point, Marla. It is, in fact, a big part of the reason for the “science” push: “Don’t think about our human/political institutions. That is forbidden and you will be punished if you try.”

  9. December 9th, 2013 at 2:49 pm

    Penny said:

    You are an asshole and if I ever met you, I know that I would hate you. If I could cast spells, I would cast a nasty one on you.

    I read your review of Molly Wizenberg’s book on Amazon.com and cannot believe that an adult would leave a review like that on a website that millions of people go to for books that they might cherish. I happen to cherish “A Homemade Life,” and even if I didn’t, I wouldn’t be as degrading and shitty when giving a review on a public site. It’s not your stupid blog, idiot.

    Then I looked at your other reviews. For the most part, you just like being a dick.

    GET. A. LIFE.

  10. December 9th, 2013 at 3:39 pm

    Michael Dawson said:

    Back atcha, Penny. The spells would certainly be flowing back onto you navel-gazing foodie poseurs, if the world really worked according to your second-rate spoilt-brat fantasies.

    As it stands, published books get reviews, and Amazon posts such reviews. Hard darts for you.

  11. December 10th, 2013 at 11:40 am

    Martin said:

    Way to go, Penny – cast those spells, girl!
    You should be aware that in internet flame wars, there never is a chance that the two combatants will meet each other.
    Perhaps you just arrived on this planet and think that the internet and its Dickensian incarnation of Amazon is only for people who might “cherish” books, as if the books are delicate Hummel figurines and all critical speech banned, but in this world, the one-star review is a chance to dissent in public.
    Does having the temerity to slam a book about making pound cake and publicly airing private grief qualify MD as megalomaniac? Or is Penny actually a false flag name of MD, concocted to raise easily-mocked ire, thereby turning up the heat in the TCT comments section If so, briliant. “It’s not your stupid blog, idiot” – priceless spycraft, sir!

  12. December 11th, 2013 at 5:27 pm

    Penny said:

    Gee. Just “a book about making pound cake,” huh? Well, why not ask Michael Dawson why he picked up a booked called, “A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes From My Kitchen Table,” in the first place, if he wasn’t interested in stories and recipes? Did he think that the stories would be about how terrible consumerism is?

    His review was lame. Plain and simple. I know for a fact that he didn’t read the whole book and that just makes him, as I said before, an ASSHOLE. He shouldn’t bother to leave a review unless he has something substantive to say.

    By the way, Mar – in: I can’t cast spells. That’s what I was lamenting. If I could, I would.

  13. December 12th, 2013 at 2:29 am

    Martin said:

    Just push yourself from that next slice of butter-fried pound cake, Penny, and understand that there are people who think “foodies” are a blight upon the culture. MD explains why the book is bad, pithily, and thereby may have saved thousands of suckers from buying the confessional book.
    I’m a little leery of your claim to know what page MD left off on, as I didn’t know that the NSA’s technological capacity extended to know our precise reading habits, but evidently the “One-Star Schoolmarm” censors are much, much more sinister and capable than I had previously thought. Think only happy thoughts! You vill eat more pound cake, ja! No von-stars, evah!

  14. December 13th, 2013 at 10:28 am

    Michael Dawson said:

    Penny doesn’t want anybody to suggest to her that the world doesn’t fit entirely into her twee little robo-fantasy. She loves neval-gazing yuppie junk like Orangette, and doesn’t want to spend any energy on anybody but herself. Hence, she can’t stand the idea that somebody might dismiss her “passion” as just another sign of the decline of the society, which it is. Her notions on book reviews are simply funny.



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