The Usual

doughtrain According to a Wall Street Journal report on the latest Commerce Department statistics, the system is functioning normally:

U.S. corporate profits hit new highs last year, driven by the tight lid firms have kept on hiring and spending almost five years into the economic recovery.

A closely watched measure of after-tax corporate profits rose to $1.9 trillion in the final three months of the year, the Commerce Department said Thursday. Corporate profits stood at 11.1% of gross domestic product, up a bit from the prior quarter.

The latest uptick underscored a factor that has dogged the economy since it emerged from recession: Many companies are guarding their cash rather than putting it back into the economy in the form of new hiring.

The normalcy extends in all the usual directions, too.  According to Advertising Age, big business marketing also grows apace:

Why would major U.S. corporations keep a tight rein on almost all costs last year — except advertising?

By continuing their firm grip on hiring and spending, U.S. corporate profits reached new highs for 2013, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Advertising expenses, at least for the top 1,000 companies, was the exception. According to Kantar Media, the biggest marketers boosted spending 3.3%, while smaller advertisers cut ad budgets 6.6%.

What’s going on?

Maybe companies figured it was cheaper to spend money on advertising than to invest in research and development to try to stay one step ahead of the competition.

But that meant advertising’s job [even more] often was to divert attention from the product itself and toward emotional and purpose-driven benefits.

What’s going on? As one of the fake product differentiators says in its ads, it’s not complicated: Corporate capitalism is succeeding at serving its one and only purpose.