Marketing to Babies

Chobani Packaging Image Non-Greek “Greek yogurt” peddler Chobani is, according to Advertising Age, gearing up to push their hyper-packaged melted ice cream-ish goop onto babies and toddlers.

The cause is the usual one — the system, a.k.a. corporate capitalist normalcy.

The beginning point is the refusal to countenance price-cutting:

Greek has enjoyed a price premium over regular yogurt, but that has started to erode as competition increases. Mr. McGuinness [Chobani's chief marketing and brand officer] pledged that Chobani would not go below a dollar per cup, saying Chobani is an “aspirational” brand.

Quite so. Despite the absolute centrality of “natural prices” in Adam Smith’s classic (though not uncritical) attempt to justify capitalism, actual capitalists, as Smith knew but failed to think through, despise price competition:

People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.

If you know your history, you know that, as soon as they were big and strong enough, major investors convinced legislatures to allow them to grow their firms to sizes and scopes that made co-respective pricing (a.k.a. inflation) the new norm. Why would Chobani give up that privilege at this late, market-totalitarian date?

From there, it’s a matter of solving and re-solving the usual business problem, competition via mushrooming, metastasizing marketing efforts within stagnant, mature markets:

The launch [of Chobani Tots] comes as the once-skyrocketing Greek yogurt category begins to show signs of maturity. Slowing growth rates have sparked a market share battle among Chobani, Yoplait, Dannon and other brands. As a result, market leader Chobani can no longer rely on overall category growth to fuel sales and must fight harder to win customers.

“It’s harder in the Greek yogurt category to lead than it used to be,” Mr. McGuinness said during his presentation. Still, the marketer sees opportunity because Greek yogurt’s U.S. household penetration is still just 37%.

The human effects include the usual expansion of marketing efforts to condition humans who cannot yet talk or think:

Chobani wants babies to go Greek. The yogurt maker, which helped pioneer Greek yogurt in the U.S., will target tykes with a new product called Chobani Tots. It’s slated to hit stores in January.

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PBS Retaliates

blackmail-note The threat of losing sponsors is one of the major factors that make the corporate capitalist media system so effective at its core task of molding behavior on behalf of the overclass.

PBS, in its continuing journey toward complete irrelevance, is apparently now deploying this weapon against its own critics, despite the timidity of the latter.

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Mickey Digital

vdp The big-faced bottle blonde at right is Julia Vander Ploeg — perfect name! — is the newly appointed digital marketing head for that hoariest and least necessary of all brands, McDonald’s.

Seems that crap peddler is “under intense pressure from Wall Street to improve sales,” per Advertising Age. So, obviously, the answer is to make sure people can Facebook their Big Mac moments.

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Judy Woodruff

Judy+Woodruff+2011+Winter+TCA+Tour+Day+5+dtRss3Tk5vdl What a personage. TCT happened to see her show tonight during her usual phony “concerned” bipartisan posing. While asking some goon about the continuing death of journalism, she asked “How will this affect consumers of news?”

Consumers of news.” Nuff (or Ruff) said. Stay tuned for Antiques Road Show, voiceover provided by “intellectual” actor Paul Giamatti.

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More Good Marketing News

tv-piranha-image Per Ad Age:

Some in the media business worried that the troubles at Nickelodeon were a warning sign that today’s digitally wired children would never grow into traditional television watchers.

“There were a lot of people who legitimately believed that it was over for kids’ television — Nick in particular and TV more broadly,” said Brian Wieser, a media analyst with Pivotal Research. “But no good evidence suggests that there was a meaningful decline in total kids’ consumption of television.”

Despite the concerns, children today are watching more television on a traditional television set than they did five years ago. Children ages 2 to 11 now spend an average of 111 hours, 47 minutes a month watching traditional television, according to Nielsen’s Cross-Platform Report for the first quarter of 2014.

That is up from the average of 108 hours, 45 minutes a month children in that age group spent watching traditional television in 2009.

This advance, of course, comes on top of the even faster rise of tablets, etc.

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More Metastasis

California_Chrome_3x2

Skechers, of course, is a particular leader in the addition of useless product features.

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