Automatrix

Sarah Mandato As “content marketing” devours the talent and space that once was journalism, its architects include the likes of Sarah Mandato (what a name for an overclass mind-molder!), “director of content solutions at Nativo, a native advertising company.” As shown at Advertising Age, here is how our dear pixie-bot thinks and talks, as she labors to get her victims to “consume” her tricks on her clients’ sites, as “brand content served within publisher editorial streams, matched to the look and feel of each publication”:

How can brands ensure they’re optimizing content?

Optimization opportunities are similar to having a focus group providing real-time feedback about what does and doesn’t appeal to readers. With today’s robust ad tech ecosystem, marketers have expanded tools to apply A/B tests and optimizations on campaigns. It’s no different with content — marketers can test their branded content’s various components, such as headlines and images. By not taking advantage of this, brands are turning down the chance to listen to consumers and gain actionable insights around messaging that best resonates with users.

Yes, “listen to.” That’s “listen to” in the mode of BB and Winston Smith, of course.

Lovely stuff, isn’t it?

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Verizon Must Go

guillotine Verizon, the mega-corporation that told its employee David Strayer to stop telling it about the massively homicidal nature of encouraging people to use cell phones inside automobiles, now has this to say about the simple, long-overdue idea of ruling that internet access is, like snail-mail, broadcast airspace, and transportation, a public utility:

“The FCC can address any harmful behavior without taking this radical step,” Michael Glover, senior VP at Verizon Communications Inc., said in an e-mailed statement. “It is counterproductive because heavy regulation of the Internet will create uncertainty and chill investment.” [Source: Advertising Age, February 4, 2015]

First off: ROFL about that “investment” trope. Verizon and its partners-in-crime are blatant organized theft on the biggest scale, and, as such, are huge, very active obstacles to the proper, economical investment in and distribution of modern communications infrastructure, activities that are the natural and Constitutionally-mandated endeavors of the United States Postal Service.

Secondly:

O corporate death penalty, where art thou?

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The Humble Inventor

Keep this in mind as you watch the charades over net neutrality:

Of course, public mention of the existence of successful public enterprise is verboten in this market totalitarian society. So, even the rebels restrain themselves from it, as they fawn over feeble, 11th-hour less-than-half measures.

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Liberalism and the Internet

old car photo So, in a display of a very slight drying of the wet noodle he has for a backbone, Zerobama now — after being careful not to mention the topic during the recent The Bi-Annual Election Show — “asks” that the FCC classify internet service provision as a common carrier. Of course, not only is this an “ask,” but Prez Z specifically also says the FCC should, despite the proposed new (but long overdue) classification, continue “forbearing from rate regulation.” “Forbearing from rate regulation,” of course, means renouncing price controls.

The unregulated regime of corporate capitalist-dominated internet service provision in the United States imposes an indefensibly but predictably slow and expensive internet infrastructure. Yet, even if the FCC were to ignore its corporate masters and grant Zerobama’s humble request, he asks that they do so only if they render themselves unable to use the main benefit of common carrier designation — price control!

Meanwhile, the U.S. Postal Service wastes away in the desert, dabbing at its shrinking, rusty thimbleful of water droplets. Imagine what the corporate profit ranchers would do to prevent us from upholding the U.S. Constitution and allowing the USPS to deliver the modern mail at the lowest possible cost and with the best modern technical standards.

Of course, liberals have always favored regulation over public enterprise, for the all-too-obvious reason.

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The Future of the Book

book cover Today marks the publication of Find Me I’m Yours, a novel with not only a run-on sentence for a title, but corporate capitalist product placements throughout. One would be very hard-pressed to find a more fitting example of the thrust of this market totalitarian culture.

The entire project is unabashedly, intentionally, 110% a marketing ploy. It consists, according to The New York Times, of the “book” in question, plus 33 associated websites “intended to host sponsored content,” all created and managed by a crew of 35 writers and internet engineers. So far, the main sponsor of the operation is “the Cumberland Packing Corporation, the Brooklyn-based company that makes Sweet’N Low.”

What did Cumberland buy? Here’s a sample, as recounted by the NYT:

The heroine of “Find Me I’m Yours,” a new novel by Hillary Carlip, is a quirky young woman named Mags who works at an online bridal magazine and is searching for love in Los Angeles.

But the story also has another, less obvious protagonist: Sweet’N Low, the artificial sweetener.

Sweet’N Low appears several times in the 356-page story, in subtle and not-so-subtle ways. In one scene, Mags, a Sweet’N Low devotee, shows off her nails, which she has painted to resemble the product’s pink packets. In another, she gets teased by a co-worker for putting Sweet’N Low in her coffee.

“Hellooo, isn’t it bad for you?” the friend asks. Mags replies that she has researched the claims online and found studies showing that the product is safe: “They fed lab rats twenty-five hundred packets of Sweet’N Low a day … And still the F.D.A. or E.P.A., or whatevs agency, couldn’t connect the dots from any kind of cancer in humans to my party in a packet.”

authors The author of this epochal prose is the former Gong Show champion and self-promoting “artist” known as Hillary Carlip. Lest you have the “Hillary” name and the teeny-bopper mentation fool you, cast eyes upon the great laureate author, who stands pictured at on the left in the photo at right with her business partner. Not exactly, as the Gong Show reference tips, a spring hen.

This project, pathetic and insubstantial as it is, is so completely disgusting, so utterly whorish, TCT finds itself, for once, unable to decide which snippets to select as proof of its revulsion. Just look for yourself!

It’s all being proffered, of course, as “a new business model for publishers.” Apparently, this kind of putrid sheepshit is what will pass for “books,” while the print-literacy-hating profit ranching system finishes ridding itself of the problem of potentially informed masses.

Feel free to drop a little offering of your own on this one.

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