Friday, July 4th, 2014

Tom Bergeron

I happen to have finally taken Public Enemy’s advice and stayed home on this date.  In the process, I noticed that the host of the official “birthday party” is none other than the host of “America’s Funniest Home Videos.”  Personally, I don’t think it’s an accident at any level.

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Posted by Michael Dawson | Filed in Lifelines | 2 Comments »

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Not Robots

“The American Dream” trope exists to implant the notion that this is a unique nation that is uniquely dedicated to the greatest happiness of all its residents. That claim is pure rubbish.

Yet, it turns out that when people are asked what they want “the American Dream” to mean, the clear majority give rather decent answers:

dream

Of course, the actual society, being rigidly dedicated to making the rich ever richer, is dreadful at fulfilling these majority desires. But more proof that the commoners aren’t the dolts so many greens and lefties assume.

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Posted by Michael Dawson | Filed in Information Control, Lifelines | 6 Comments »

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

More Metastasis

California_Chrome_3x2

Skechers, of course, is a particular leader in the addition of useless product features.

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Posted by Michael Dawson | Filed in Bad Products | Comment now »

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

Red States

needle The U.S. South is some piece of work. But, for some unfathomable reason, it now seems to be home to sparks of actual progress and civilization. Public enterprise has happened there in a couple of meaningful ways.

Lafayette, Louisiana has fought off lawsuits and built itself its own communications infrastructure.

Now, it seems that Somerset, Kentucky is about to start operating its own gas stations.

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Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Ralph Roberts’ Favorite Saying

ralph Ralph Roberts founded Comcast before handing its reins to his son, Brian L. Roberts. Here’s how Ralph describes his business’s core idea:

I didn’t burn any bridges with Muzak when I left there, and my brother, who unfortunately passed away in 1972, had been the advertising director at Revlon and had a similar career to mine. He was also in advertising and marketing, and Muzak Corporation, after I had left for some time, invited him to come over to be a senior vice-president of the company, and one day he came in to me and he said, “You know, Ralph, we ought to buy some of these franchises. They’re a license to steal as recurring monthly income.” That was our favorite expression, just like cable. You put in the equipment and every month they send you money.

Such is the true stuff of the great private-sector boondoggles.

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Posted by Michael Dawson | Filed in Bad Products, Behind the Scenes | 24 Comments »

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

FCC Surpasses Orwell

orwell-truth Zerobama promised his suckers constituents net neutrality. They are getting the exact usual. Per The Wall Street Journal:

The Federal Communications Commission advanced new Internet rules that would ban broadband providers from blocking or slowing down websites, but allow them to strike deals with content companies for preferential treatment.

So, those who own the roads can’t slow somebody down, but can sell access to faster routes? Only in America, folks, does such blatant DoubleThink get reported straight out, without the slightest snicker or blush.

Of course, how do Comcast and its soon-to-be-acquired “rivals” own the road? Graft, pure and plain.

And check out the ultimate Obamian trick the FCC is now using to finish sealing the deal:

The broadband providers have signaled that they can live with Mr. Wheeler’s approach as drafted.

Democratic commissioners Jessica Rosenworcel and Mignon Clyburn joined Mr. Wheeler in voting to advance the notice of proposed rule-making, which will now be open to public comment for 60 days, followed by another 60 days for replies.

Observers expect unprecedented engagement during the comment period, but it remains to be seen how much the final proposal shifts from what Mr. Wheeler has already proposed. Mr. Wheeler’s proposal assumes a strong FCC would aggressively police deals between providers and content companies.

Yes, it certainly does remain to be seen. Any wagers?

Meanwhile, here’s what the WSJ says about the Democratic Party:

Democrats are largely in favor of net neutrality but still divided on the best approach, with a few favoring reclassification and others still on the fence. Mr. Wheeler’s approach also has found favor with some Democrats who worry reclassification would kill investment in broadband deployment.

Translation? Five words: “The Democrats oppose net neutrality.”

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