Metastasis of the Corporate Panopticon

In a report on how corporate spying and data mining contribute(d) to the general debt-pushed financial implosion, today’s New York Times conveys a bit of news on how the big business marketing juggernaut continues to do what it always does — grow in size and sophistication:

The American information economy has been evolving for decades. Equifax, for example, has been compiling financial histories of consumers for more than a century. Since 1970, use of that data has been regulated by the Federal Trade Commission under the Fair Credit Reporting Act. But Equifax and its rivals started offering new sets of unregulated demographic data over the last decade — not just names, addresses and Social Security numbers of people, but also their marital status, recent births in their family, education history, even the kind of car they own, their television cable service and the magazines they read.

The data agencies start by categorizing consumers into groups. Equifax, for example, says that 115 million Americans are listed in its “Niches 2.0” database. Its “Oodles of Offspring” grouping contains heads of household who make an average of $36,000 a year, are high school graduates and have children, blue-collar jobs and a low home value. People in the “Midlife Munchkins” group make $71,000 a year, have children or grandchildren, white-collar jobs and a high level of education.

In addition to selling these buckets of names, data compilers and banks also employ a variety of methods to estimate the likelihood that people will need new debt, even before they know it themselves.

One technique is called “predictive modeling.” Financial institutions and their consultants might look at who is responding favorably to an existing mailing campaign — one that asks people to refinance their homes, for example — and who has simply thrown the letter in the trash.

The attributes of the people who bite on the offer, like their credit card debt, cash savings and home value, are then plugged into statistical models. Those models then are used for the next round of offers, sent to people with similar financial lives.

The brochure for one Equifax data product, called TargetPoint Predictive Triggers, advertises “advanced profiling techniques” to identify people who show a “statistical propensity to acquire new credit” within 90 days.

An Equifax spokesman said the exact formula was part of the company’s “secret sauce.”

Such is the normal course of affairs in our market totalitarian social order — unceasing, unregulated, and politically undiscussed expansion of the overclass’s capacities to dictate human experience, behavior, and choices.

And, as I argued in The Consumer Trap, the effects of this on individuals are small but very real:

In 2005, Experian, and then rivals Equifax and TransUnion, started selling lists of these consumers to other banks and brokers, whose loan officers would then contact the customer and compete for the loan.

At Visions Marketing Services, a company in Lancaster, Pa., that conducts telemarketing campaigns for banks, mortgage trigger leads were marketing gold during the housing boom.

“We called people who were astounded,” said Alan E. Geller, chief executive of the firm. “They said, ‘I can’t believe you just called me. How did you know we were just getting ready to do that?’ ”

And, as I also argued in the book, the collective impact of having our individual actions scientifically nudged around like this is akin to an attack by a school of piranhas on a wounded animal.

In these days of economic meltdown and mounting pain for the commoners, the fact that this subtle but central and ever-growing kind of coercion is still miles away from anybody’s political agenda speaks volumes about the scale of our predicament.

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Real Estate Agent

Great points, Michael. It is amazing that companies are taking advantage of consumers like this. No one should have taken advantage of homeowners for corporate gains. Helping people out is one thing… taking advantage is something else.

RCfirefly
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RCfirefly

These are great points. I had never thought of the credit reporting companies as selling us out to other companies. the worst part of all of this is the invasion of our private spending habits once when everyone dealt in cash the green stuff now everyhting can be tracked with our credit/ debit cards. to make things worse these corporations have began to expect us the consumer to just give them the right to access our accounts. We can blame corporations but in part we are to blame because we thought we could have it all and now we have… Read more »