The Christmas Creep

july santa This item is not Earth-shattering news to anybody, but this system does have its pressures, and they do not relent. From Stuart Elliott:

For Marketers, Christmas Started Last Month
By STUART ELLIOTT
Published: October 31, 2010

NOW that Halloween is done, Madison Avenue is embarking on the mad dash to Dec. 25.

The sluggish economy is raising the stakes for the Christmas shopping season. Some retailers and marketers, worried that uncertainty among shoppers might increase as the weeks go by, hope to pull demand forward by moving up the start of their pitches.

Of course, the pressure to stretch the year’s great orgy of needless buying, misdirected giving, and extra-exploitative marketing runs in both directions:

Never mind those concerned about ads that make it seem that the holiday arrives too soon. Coca-Cola worries about it ending too early.

“Our challenge is to keep Christmas going,” said Shay Drohan, senior vice president for sparkling brands at Coca-Cola, so “it goes the whole way through the first week in January” and takes in New Year’s Eve, school holidays and Twelfth Night.

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Sean G
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I was in a department store a few weeks ago, around Oct 15, and there were trees, wreaths, bows, and lights already on display, right next to the Halloween decorations.

Apparently, the answer to less consumer spending is more advertising spending. Kind of like the answer to budget shortfalls is revenue reduction.

Michael Dawson
Guest

Except that advertising actually does combat the problem, albeit marginally. It gets people to keep their credit cards maxed out, etc.

Marketers use ROI analysis to weigh their decisions and results.

Michael Dawson
Guest

Marketing is also a major stimulus to the corporate capitalist economy, both by boosting commoners’ spending and by the sheer scale of the marketing effort, which employs millions and uses up probably 15-20 percent of GDP.