Wealth and Delusion

Frau Klatten spricht…

Sociology’s cardinal hypothesis is that circumstance affects human perception and behavior, often to a degree that rivals or excels biological factors.

There are interesting empirical tests of this claim here and here.

One thing modern researchers seem to be confirming is that too much money is quite bad for individual mental health.

With this hypothesis in mind, get a load of this excerpt from an interview of Suzanne Klatten, the German heiress who became a billionaire by accomplishing the extremely difficult task of being born to the majority owners of the BMW corporation:

Q: The concern is that society is breaking up into poor and rich people…


A: Klatten: There is a degree of mistrust in the social space that worries us as entrepreneurs. We know that redistribution has never worked. 
I think fairness is when everyone can take advantage of their abilities and develop their full potential. And if you actively promote that, then many people can get very far. Our [own] potential reveals itself in [our] having inherited and developed a legacy. We work hard every day. 
This role as guardian of fortune also has personal sides that are not so beautiful: you are constantly visible and at risk, must protect yourself. 
Added to this is envy, a trait widespread in Germany in particular. 
That’s why I feel misunderstood, to be honest: they focus on dividends. 
The rest that connects with it, is hidden. My brother pointed this out in an interview and asked: Who would want to trade with us?

This, of course, is straight-up Marie Antoinette. In a supposed meritocracy, noblesse oblige is alive and well, with the usual psychotic analysis of what constitutes the noble.

Meanwhile, would that the German people were given an actual chance to answer Madame Bimer’s question about trading places…

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