Cultural Heroes

nero fiddle In the year 2017, in a world that needs to solve its problems of runway wealth maldistribution/population growth, ecological non-sustainability, and politico-military chaos, what are the leading lights of corporate capitalist innovation worrying about and working on? This, per Advertising Age:

“This is a unique moment in the ad industry,” Mr. Joe Marchese said. “If we don’t work together, ad-free models will continue to proliferate.”

“We are trying to figure out how to create new models that transfer attention more efficiently,” said Fox TV marketer David Levy.

“We know there is a need to lower the ad load because we inundated consumers and they are now tuning out and blocking,” said Helen Lin, president-digital investment and partnership, Publicis Media U.S. “When you increase the number of ads, your lift potential is reduced. We know we have to do something before consumers completely block out.”

Lovely, ain’t it?

Don Drumpf as an Object of Shame

As usual, reading the big business marketing press is more helpful than most regular journalism. Seems that the main cause of the unusually big errors in the marketing research tools used to conduct and predict the gigantic 18-month marketing operations we perceive as political elections was the fact that a significant number of Drumpf voters are ashamed of themselves:

How did so many pollsters get the presidential election so wrong? The answer may involve shame, some of which belongs to research organizations themselves.

The other part of the shame belonged to Trump voters, many of them unwilling to admit, particularly to live human beings on the other end of the phone, their plans to vote for the president-elect.

That was an effect that Trafalgar Group, a small Atlanta-based Republican-affiliated polling firm, began noticing during the Republican primaries. So it developed a system to counteract the effect. Trafalgar started asking voters not only who they planned to vote for, but also who they thought their neighbors would vote for. The latter percentage consistently came out higher number than the former, said Robert Cahaly, senior strategist.

“On a live poll, the deviation was that Trump was understated probably 6%-7%, and on an automatic poll it was probably understated 3%-4%,” Mr. Cahaly said.

Quite comical and telling that the elite hacks running Brand Klinton seem to have utterly missed this aspect of reality in their pathetic efforts to peddle an even more pathetic product.

The answer to the errors, as always, is to better reduce politics to marketing:

Political polling may be more closely watched and higher profile, but in many ways it needs to catch up with brand market research, said Simon Chadwick, founding and managing partner of Cambiar, a consulting firm for market-research agencies and their investors.

“What’s happening increasingly in marketing is that survey research is being used to complement other forms of data,” he said, be it transactional data, social-media listening, ethnography or neuroscience. “People increasingly are synthesizing those other forms of data,” he said, “but in politics it doesn’t seem to have happened.”

Directors of Empathy

This, per Advertising Age, exists:

Scott Madden is senior partner-director of empathy and evolution at Boston-based Connelly Partners.

It gets even better. Here’s the promise from said agency:

At Connelly Partners, we believe in the undeniable power of empathy. So we weave it into every piece of communications we create. We call it Empathy Engineering. It’s what helps our work resonate with your target in a more powerful and memorable fashion. It’s not rocket science. It’s marketing science.

Empathy engineering. Nuff said.

Ad Age Worried About Killary Losing California

hillary-clinton Hillary Clinton, who looks authentic responding to charges of corruption and sitting in on war crimes but looks like the cat who swallowed the canary in front of actual working class people and groups, might lose the upcoming California primary.

Among the many reasons to hope that happens is the fact that Advertising Age magazine, the flagship of the big business marketing press and the enterprise that named the war-criminal architect of Romneycare’s passage its 2008 Marketer of the Year, fears that Killary losing California might “cause a fatal chain reaction.”

Fascinating and telling that the prospective failure to sell the long-sponsored Klinton show might be such a huge blow to our existing system of “election” via political marketing…

This system is a mile wide and endowed with trillions, but remains a mere inch deep.

What is Spotify?

“According to its most recent publicly-available measure, Spotify has 45 million active users that can receive ads, and another 30 million subscribers.” So reports Advertising Age today.

What is the purpose?

“With Spotify and Krux working together, we have access to first-party data allowing us to better target specific people and user groups such as those looking for auto insurance and commuters,” said Cyndie Beckwith, VP-marketing at Esurance. “For this initiative, we wanted to add on some similar targeting approaches that we’ve been leveraging across desktops to streaming audio, and in particular mobile streaming audio.”

Listening to playlists is an increasingly common experience on Spotify, and the company is investing in analyzing such listening data and enhancing it with third-party demographic information — some of which Krux provides, such as education status and household income. The company tracks when specific users listen to playlists, for example when someone starts a “running” playlist around the same time most mornings, it can be used to determine that that person is actually running during those times.

Spotify has grown to use such data as a proxy for determining user activities and moods, said Brian Benedik, global head of sales at Spotify. An adult activating a playlist of kids’ music is likely a parent, for example.

Data harvesting and real-time marketing are the purpose. Spotify is overclass spyware.

Adieu, National Basketball Association

race-bottom If you like both basketball and human freedom, enjoy next season of the NBA. The one after that should be the end of your willingness to pay it any attention, as 2017-2018 will mark the arrival of advertisements on game-day jerseys.

Here’s the lovely explanation, per ESPN:

“It’s manifest destiny,” [NBA Commissioner Adam] Silver told ESPN’s Rachel Nichols last month. “So let’s begin by saying this isn’t going to affect the competition. What we’re talking about is a patch on the jersey. And one of the reasons we want to do it is that it creates an additional investment in those companies in the league … the amplification we get from those sponsors, those marketing partners of the league, who want to attach to our teams and our players. But once they put their name on the jerseys, they’ll then use their media to promote the NBA extensively. That’s probably the greatest reason for us to do it.”

A Golden Hicksie to you, Mr. Silver. Enjoy it.